Monthly Archives: April 2015

The Mini Goggles

The Mini and Augmented Reality

Mini cooper is creating an augmented reality headset. Yes, as in the car company, the same one where you can build your own car.

Mini’s new augmented reality headset will be worn while driving. Usually distracted driving is not legal, but mini assures its users the augmented reality will not obstruct any vehicles, lanes, markers, signs– you know, the things we’re supposed to pay attention to on the road.

Mini’s goggles are (ironically) not mini, clunky, looks-like-WW2-flying-goggles and are meant to be worn all the time. Yeah, all the time. The goggles are primarily meant for driving (obviously) but can be used outside the mini. An example of what they could be used for is an art gallery, which is to say you’ll see computer art, but in real life… kinda?

One of the many features of the Mini goggles is X-Ray View. Not in a cool, Superman, see-

Courtesy of DC Comics

Courtesy of DC Comics

through-shirts kind of X-Ray, but in a way that allows the user to see through the doors or blindspot, allowing them to see objects obstructed by the car.

All in all, these seem cool because augmented reality is rad, not because it can be used in a mini cooper.

 

It’s also less cool because the model for it is ridiculous disproportionate.

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Is he 12 feet tall? What’s with his narrow legs? What’s going on here?

Best Worst Weapons in Video Games

Video games are known for some ridiculous plots, impossible body proportions and some of the most absurd weapons. Here is a list of our top five favorite worst weapons in video games.

5) The Lancer-Gears of War

The Lancer is the result of a drunken hook-up between a machine gun and a chainsaw. Besides the obvious dangers of having a chainsaw at the end of an assault rifle, such as the kick-back causing you to lose your balance and cut off your own head, the Lancer seems way too heavy to use as a chainsaw and not balanced enough to use as a gun. Either way, the thing is ridiculous and not likely to help out in a gun-fighting or lumberjack situation.

The Lancer from Gears of War. Courtesy of Game Trailers.

The Lancer from Gears of War. Courtesy of Game Trailers.

4) The Klobb-Goldeneye 007

The Klobb looked like some heavy-duty artillery, something needed when you’re fighting those damn Commies. Much like the USSR, the Klobb doesn’t shoot too far. The bullets always seem to miss, regardless of how well you aim, and when you do manage to actually hit Comrade Plokho Pistolet, the damage is astoundingly minimal. As one entry from Urban Dictionary describes the Klobb, “A Soviet gun specifically designed to miss its target.”

The Klobb (you can guess which one) is not the most effective weapon in Goldeneye 007. Courtesy of tvtropes.org.

The Klobb (you can guess which one) is not the most effective weapon in Goldeneye 007. Courtesy of tvtropes.org.

 

3) Dolls-Final Fantasy X

The Final Fantasy series is known to be a bit outrageous across the board, but one character, Lulu, takes the why-would-you-use-that cake. She possess ability to use dark magic, but uses that magic to make dolls walk up to bad guys and explode. It’d be cool if the dolls did some significant damage, but they don’t. After she figures out how to inflict significant damage, maybe someone can tell her belts are meant to be worn one at a time.

 

Lulu, from Final Fantasy X, uses enchanted dolls as "weapons." Courtesy of Final Fantasy Wiki.

Lulu, from Final Fantasy X, uses enchanted dolls as “weapons.” Courtesy of Final Fantasy Wiki.

2) The Penetrator-Saints Row: The Third

While this -ahem- weapon does inflict quite a bit of damage, it is a rubber, phallic shaped weapon at that. And while anyone who has ever come in contact with a dick has experienced some damage, it’s still 100% ridiculous, even if the metaphor is there.

The Penetrator is a tool of mass destruction. It's also a weapon in Saints Row: The Third. Courtesy of SaintsRow Wiki.

The Penetrator is a tool of mass destruction. It’s also a weapon in Saints Row: The Third. Courtesy of SaintsRow Wiki.

 

1) The Stick-Fable

It’s a stick. Not much we can say here. You get it before you get a sword, and it can’t be dropped or sold once you get more useful weapons. It’s just a stick.

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Prizmiq's website is an example of a mobile-friendly site

Be mobile, or be ignorable.

On Feb. 26, Google announced two big changes to its algorithms: mobile friendly sites will appear closer to the top in a search and search results will display relevant app content. These changes were made because Google users are more likely to search on mobile devices.  Today is the day the new algorithms are being launched.

However, this change can impact about 40% of Fortune 500 websites. According to a TechCrunch article, 44% of Fortune 500 company websites do not have mobile-friendly versions.

This could result in a huge decline in site visit and an increased bounce rate. About 43% of online searches are from a mobile devices, and if a site is unreadable no one will stay on it for too long.

An artist's rendering of the mechanics of the Antikythera mechanism. Courtesy of Wikipedia.

Wacky Wednesday: The First Computer

The remains of the largest  gear of the mechanism. Courtesy of Wikipedia.

The remains of the largest gear of the mechanism. Courtesy of Wikipedia.

Computers as we know them today were first created in the late 1940s when the ENIAC was used to calculate artillery firing tables for the US Army. The first analog computer ever made though was the Antikythera mechanism.

The Antikythera mechanism was discovered by Greek divers in April 1990 off the island of Antikythera near Point Glyphadia. The mechanism is thought to be used to predict the astronomical patterns and eclipses for astronomical purposes and is dated between 150 and 100 BCE.

The Antikythera mechanism was found in 82 fragments, and only seven of those fragments have gears. The largest gear is 140 mm in diameter and thought to have 230 teeth. The mechanism had a fixed ring with the 12 zodiac symbols of the Babylonian calendar and a rotating ring with the 12 months of the Egyptian calendar. The rotating ring was moved with hand crank to the desired date of the Babylonian calendar to determine the position of the Sun, moon, moon phases and eclipses, each of which were also on their own rotating rings.

While the information this analog computer provided is now a Google search away, the ancient Greeks proved to be resourceful in their tech along with inventing democracy and Olympic sports.